Ian Kennedy

Ian Kennedy is a computational social scientist trained working at the intersection of race, digital platforms, and text analysis. Their work aims to contribute to understandings of how contemporary racism works, in both visible and less visible ways. This means looking for data in new places, like in Craigslist rental ad texts, by developing new uses for large-scale administrative data, or by curating large samples of twitter data linked to election misinformation. They are committed to producing useful work beyond scholarly publications, working with groups like the Northwest Justice Project to identify illegal Craigslist ads or with the Election Integrity Partnership to monitor misinformation during the 2020 election.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Kennedy, Ian, Morgan Wack, Andrew Beers, Joseph Schafer, Isabella Garcia-Camargo, Emma Spiro, and Kate Starbird. 2022.“Repeat Spreaders and Election Delegitimization Narratives: A Comprehensive Dataset of Misinformation Tweets from the 2020 U.S. Election.” The Journal of Quantitative Description.

Joseph B. Bak-Coleman, Ian Kennedy, Morgan Wack, Andrew Beers, Joseph S Schafer, Emma S. Spiro, Kate Starbird, and Jevin D. West. 2022. “Combining interventions to reduce the spread of viral misinformation.” Nature Human Behavior.

Kennedy, Ian, Chris Hess, Amandalynne Paullada, and Sarah Chasins. 2021. "Racialized Discourse in Seattle Rental Ad Texts." Social Forces 99, no. 4: 1432-1456.

Larimore, Savannah, Ian Kennedy, Breon Haskett, and Alina Arseniev-Koehler. 2021. "Reconsidering Annotator Disagreement about Racist Language: Noise or Signal?." In Proceedings of the Ninth International Workshop on Natural Language Processing for Social Media, pp. 81-90.

Kate K. O’Neill, Ian Kennedy, and Alexes Harris. 2021. “Debtors’ Blocks: How monetary sanctions make between-neighborhood racial and economic inequalities worse.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity.

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