Craig M. Considine

Dr. Craig Considine is a scholar, global speaker, media contributor, and public intellectual based at the Department of Sociology at Rice University. He is the author of many books and articles. Dr. Considine's opinions have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, BBC, CBS News, Fox News, MSNBC, Newsweek, and Foreign Policy. He has been invited to speak at some of the leading international organizations and universities in the world. Dr. Considine is visible on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. He holds a PhD from Trinity College – University of Dublin, an MSc from Royal Holloway – University of London, and a BA from American University in Washington, DC. Dr. Considine is a U.S. Catholic of Irish and Italian descent.

BOOKS:

The Dialogue of Civilizations: Muhammad’s Interactions With Christians (In Progress)

The Prophet of Love: A Catholic’s Note on Prophet Muhammad (2020). Tughra Books: Clifton, New Jersey.

Islam in America: Exploring the Issues (2019). ABC-CLIO: Santa Barbara, California.

Muslims in America: Examining the Facts (2018). ABC-CLIO: Santa Barbara, California.

Muhammad Nabi Cinta: Catatan Seorang Nasrani tentange Rasullullah Saw (2018). Noura: Jakarta, Indonesia.

Islam, Race, and Pluralism in the Pakistani Diaspora (2017). Routledge: New York, New York.

SELECTED ARTICLES & OP-EDS:

“The Sri Lanka Church Bombings Are the Opposite of What Prophet Muhammad Intended.” 2019. Newsweek, April 23.

“Notre Dame and Al-Aqsa Fires Give Christians and Muslims a Chance to Work Together to Repair Their Sacred Spaces.” (2019). Newsweek, April 16. *Appeared in Print Edition.”

“Young Pakistani Men and Irish Identity – Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland.” (2018). Sociology 52(4): 655-670.

“The Racialization of Islam in the United States: Islamophobia, Hate Crimes and ‘Flying While Brown.’” 2017. Religions 8(9): 1-19.

“The Rohingya Are the New Palestinians.” 2017. Foreign Policy, September 26.

“Religious Pluralism and Civic Rights in a ‘Muslim Nation’: An Analysis of Prophet Muhammad’s Covenants with Christians.” 2016. Religions 7(15): 1-21.

Research Areas

Muslims in the United States, Islamophobia, Christian-Muslim Relations, Prophet Muhammad, American National Identity, Religious Pluralism, Diaspora